List of neologisms

By dkl9, written 2023-185, revised 2023-359 (6 revisions)


Here are some neologisms I made.


§ anti-hobby

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /'æn.ti'hɑ.bi/.

noun. something that habitually and intentionally avoids

Boring but original use of existing words.

Example: Social media has long been an anti-hobby for me, made easier by my phone.

§ lie-from-children

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced according to its component words.

noun. inaccurate or oversimplified explanation or remark, made sith the speaker doesn't fully understand what they're saying

By analogy to "lie-to-children".

Example: Apathetic amateurs stuffed lies-from-children into their lectures.

§ on rhabdo

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /ɔn'ɹæb.doʊ/.

preposition. in a weaker, smaller, less intense form

By analogy to "on steroids", with "rhabdo" abbreviating "rhabdomyolysis", a breakdown of muscles roughly the opposite of steroidal effects.

Example: Toki pona is Chinese on rhabdo.

§ elneg

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /'εl.nεg/.

adjective. electronegative; noun. electronegativity

Abbreviation of "electronegative".

Example: Ceteris paribus, the more elneg the atom bonded to hydrogen, the stronger the acid.

§ karmer

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /kɑɹ.mɚ/.

noun. one who acts with the intent of collecting positive karma, rather than directly being good (karma in either the religious reality sense or online voting sense)

Portmanteau of "karma" and "farmer".

Example: They're lurking in many forums to figure out where they can be a karmer.

§ stuch

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /stʌtʃ/.

noun. such stuff

Portmanteau of "stuff" and "such".

Example: In the first few seconds after the Big Bang, the universe consisted of a disorganised soup of quarks and stuch.

§ nepotise

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /'nεp.ə.taɪz/.

verb. to favour relatives in the manner of nepotism

Back-formation from "nepotism".

Example: I considered asking a relative to nepotise me into a job.

§ inferiorequentist

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /ɪn'fiɹ.i.ɚ'i.kwənt.ɪst/.

noun. derogatory synonym of "frequentist" (i.e. one opposed to Bayesianism as philosophy of probability)

Portmanteau of "inferior" and "frequentist".

Example: You might see my essay on Bayesianism as a rebuttal to the inferiorequentists.

§ sith

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /sɪθ/.

adverb, conjunction. because/since/for (this reason)

Revival of archaic "sith", originally from "sithen".

Example: I use "sith" sith it's one syllable, or three letters, shorter than "because".

§ pagochrony

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /'pɑ.goʊ.kɹoʊ.ni/.

noun. pausing events around oneself, freezing of time

From the Greek-based morphemes "pago-" and "-chrony".

Example: We were suggested a choice of one of a few superpowers: strength, flight, pagochrony, neurolexia, or invisibility.

§ will issue

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced according to its component words.

noun. the inability to do a thing due to not (really) wanting to, including but not limited to akrasia

By analogy to "skill issue".

Example: You wrote so many recreational essays, but haven't published any? Sounds like a will issue.

§ surgicate

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /'sɜɹ.dʒɪ.keɪt/.

verb. to perform surgery

Modified from existing "surgery".

Example: We had to surgicate her back.

§ nyctophagy

Coined in 2023.

Pronounced /nɪk'tɒ.fə.dʒi/.

noun. nighttime eating

From the Greek-based morphemes "nycto-" and "-phagy".

Example: Eating only dinner, I was a nyctophage for a few months.

§ crux

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /kɹʌks/.

verb. to make something, in a manner such that an indirect object is the crux

Extension of existing word.

Example: I cruxed my multiplicative closure proof on induction.

§ eulexia

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /ju'lεk.si.ə/.

noun. unusual skill with reading and words, the opposite of dyslexia

By analogy to "dyslexia", with the Greek-based morpheme "eu-".

Example: I expect the eulexic are overrepresented among linguists.

§ sweet grapes

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced according to its component words.

noun. appreciation/desire for something originally ignored upon finding it easily obtained, or a thing so desired

By analogy to "sour grapes".

Example: Many giveaways are only claimed out of perception of sweet grapes.

§ lindy

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /'lɪn.di/.

adjective. already lasting for a while and being expected to last for a while longer; verb. to challenge a person/institution/technology/ideology/etc to test its fragility and make its lifespan reflect that

Back-formation from "Lindy effect".

Example: Contemporary society has been lindying the major religions of the past.

§ anti-ethos

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /'æn.ti'i.θɑs/.

noun. a writer/speaker's deliberate statements to remind the reader/listener of their unreliability

Boring but original use of existing words.

Example: My essay on fake solitude starts with some anti-ethos.

§ hypoplane

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /'haɪ.poʊ.pleɪn/.

noun. a line or a point

By analogy to "hyperplane" (higher-dimensional equivalent of a plane) with "hypo-".

Example: In geometry, a flat, or Euclidean subspace, is one of a hypoplane, a plane, or a hyperplane.

§ slant bracket

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced according to its component words.

noun. either of a pair of slashes used as delimeters around text

By analogy to "round bracket", "square bracket", "curly bracket", etc.

Example: IPA phonemic transcriptions are delimited with slant brackets.

§ isomorph

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /'aɪ.soʊ.moɹf/.

verb. to change something by an isomorphism

Back-formation from "isomorphism".

Example: The first step of the solution is to isomorph the problem into the language of graph theory.

§ misonym

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /'mɪs.ə.nɪm/.

noun. misnomer, or a strange (not just fancy) word used when an ordinary one works

Misonym of "misnomer".

Example: Many usages of neologisms like these would be thoroughly misonymic.

§ eclentric

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /εk'lεn.tɹɪk/.

adjective. eccentric and eclectic, strange and of many interests

Portmanteau of "eccentric" and "eclectic".

Example: dkl9.net contains eclentric content, especially in the essays.

§ algodynia

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /al.goʊ'dɪ.ni.ə/.

noun. pain, especially extreme pain

From the Greek-based morphemes "algo-" and "-dynia".

Example: Contact with Dendrocnide moroides is known to induce algodynia.

§ clock shock

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced according to its component words.

noun. disturbance at how late it is

By analogy to "sticker shock".

Example: Editing the website yesterday, I got too focused and hit clock shock when I stopped.

§ masochise

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /'mæs.ə.kaɪz/.

verb. to subject oneself to pain sith one enjoys it

Back-formation from "masochism".

Example: Some programmers masochise themselves by writing in assembly.

§ terroree

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /'tεɹ.əɹ.i/.

noun. one who is terrorised, terror victim

By analogy to "terrorist" and other pairs such as "trainer"/"trainee".

Example: The many terrorees asked their government to help. It didn't work, and that's just what the terrorists wanted.

§ kregu

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /'kre.gu/, /'kɹe.gu/, or /'kɹε.gu/.

interjection. used to indicate satisfaction

Contraction of Dutton Speedwords "k r e gu", literally "that will be good".

Example: Alice prepares a product for Bob; Bob watches and interrupts "kregu" when it's done enough for his purposes.

§ defensive sabotage

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced according to its component words.

noun. an actively self-harmful action intended to prevent greater harm

Boring but original use of existing words.

Example: I was worried someone who didn't know my objections would post the records online, so I defensively sabotaged myself by posting my own version first.

§ brain-JIT

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced according to its component words.

noun. a temporary skill rapidly acquired during a repetitive task, or the development of such a skill

The human equivalent of "JIT", meaning "just-in-time compilation".

Example: My brain-JIT activated as I did textbook problems asking me to predict the Turing machine's behaviour.

§ basketball in a haystack

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced according to its component words.

noun. a thing very easily found

By analogy to "needle in a haystack".

Example: Weird and memorable words are basketballs in haystacks once you can use grep.

§ quarcity

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /'kwɑɹ.sɪ.ti/.

noun. speed (esp. of a production process)

Loosely based on "velocity", intended to fit with "quality" and "quantity".

Example: We value quality over quarcity.

§ received name

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced according to its component words.

noun. a name developed incidentally rather than deliberately given

By analogy to "given name".

Example: Some nicknames formed as received names.

§ oxysophon

Coined in 2022.

Pronounced /ɑk.si'soʊ.fɑn/.

noun. a pair of words that align in meaning and reinforce each other

By analogy to "oxymoron", replacing "-moron" (fool) with "-sophon" (wise). ("Oxymoron" breaks down as "sharp fool", and "oxysophon" as "sharp wisdom".)

Example: "Accidental mistake" is a bit of an oxysophon.

§ domain-naive

Coined in 2021.

Pronounced according to its component words.

adjective. uninformed in a particular topic

Boring but original use of existing words.

Example: Being domain-naive, I shouldn't try to teach you about cooking.

§ kleptology

Coined in 2021.

Pronounced /klεp'tɒl.ə.dʒi/.

noun. the study of theft

From the Greek-based morphemes "klepto-" and "-logy".

Example: I used to know a detective who specialised in kleptology.

§ don't make the good the enemy of the perfect

Coined in 2021.

Pronounced according to its component words.

proverb. don't reject improvement just sith the thing to improve is already good

By analogy to "don't make the perfect the enemy of the good".

Example: (it's a proverb; you just say it in isolation)

§ swip

Coined in 2021.

Pronounced /swɪp/.

verb. to swap or flip, or anything in-between

Portmanteau of "swap" and "flip".

Example: The document made more sense after swipping the last couple paragraphs.

§ sciensophic

Coined in 2021.

Pronounced /saɪ.ən'sɒ.fɪk/.

adjective. scientific and philosophical

Portmanteau of "scientific" and "philosophical".

Example: The interpretation of quantum mechanics is a deeply sciensophic concern.